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Another story relates that Bertram's forebear, called Norman de Verdun, arrived in Normandy in the suite of Rollo, first Duke of Normandy, but this is likely to be a mix-up with the 'Norman de Verdun' who was a grandson of Bertram I de Verdun, and it would be odd for Rollo the Viking to arrive with another Norseman who bore such an un-Scandinavian name as 'de Verdun'.A book by historian and heraldic expert Beryl Platts - 'Scottish Hazard, Volume Two: The Flemish Heritage' (latest edition 1990) - supports the story of the de Verdun family of Normandy's descent from the Counts of Verdun-sur-Meuse in Lorraine. "The first Bigod..Robert 'le Bigot', grandfather of the girls who would marry the two Williams d'Aubigny.This manor had been held previously by Goda, daughter of Emma of Normandy by her husband King Æthelred the Unready and therefore a full sister of Edward the Confessor.Goda's second husband (her first had been Count Drogo of the Véxin), Count Eustace II of Boulogne, married afterwards Ida the daughter of Godfrey III, who is said to have been Bertram de Verdun's father.After his death, his younger brother Baldwin became the first crusader king of Jerusalem.What Platts writes above is of additional interest because the 1st Earl of Chester of the second creation, Hugh d'Avranches succeeded his father Richard le Goz as Vicomte of Avranches and the de Verdun family held lands in Normandy and England from Hugh and his descendants.In fact, at least some supporting evidence is there.French genealogists give Richard de Surdeval, who lived near the comital centre at Mortain, a descent from Verdun, on the Meuse; and Bertram de Verdun's presence at a place in the Avranchin called, evocatively enough, Bouillon, speaks for itself".

It is a valuable and much appreciated addition to the many texts that enlighten our knowledge of the de Verduns, but its understandable focus on the main line of the family means that it omits useful data from French historical sources and therefore mention of what might be the senior branch of the family, who continue to reside in Normandy, and whose story continued to connect with England, during the times that Normandy was ruled by that country's kings.It also misses the importance to the de Verdun family of the fact that the Earls of Chester were also hereditary Vicomtes of Avranches - this is relevant to understanding the de Verduns ongoing possession of land in Normandy and their close connection with County Palatine of Cheshire.Members of the de Verdun family were in the service of the Earls of Chester and appear as witnesses to their charters in both England and Normandy.The intention is that further reading of the text, ensuing reflection and research and simple moments of freer time may result in these gaps being 'plugged', enabling a fuller picture to be revealed in due course.Consequently, the text below will have unedited errors and will be being updated as and when there is time to add new information or correct and edit the current text.

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