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There was an enormous amount of building in the period, all over the English-speaking world, and the standards of construction were generally high.

Where they have not been demolished, large numbers of Georgian buildings have survived two centuries or more, and they still form large parts of the core of cities such as London, Edinburgh, Dublin, Newcastle upon Tyne and Bristol.

Major architects to promote the change in direction from baroque were Colen Campbell, author of the influential book Vitruvius Britannicus (1715–1725); Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and his protégé William Kent; Isaac Ware; Henry Flitcroft and the Venetian Giacomo Leoni, who spent most of his career in England.

Other prominent architects of the early Georgian period include James Paine, Robert Taylor, and John Wood, the Elder.

John Nash was one of the most prolific architects of the late Georgian era known as The Regency style, he was responsible for designing large areas of London.

Greek Revival architecture was added to the repertory, beginning around 1750, but increasing in popularity after 1800.

Georgian succeeded the English Baroque of Sir Christopher Wren, Sir John Vanbrugh, Thomas Archer, William Talman, and Nicholas Hawksmoor; this in fact continued into at least the 1720s, overlapping with a more restrained Georgian style.

The architect James Gibbs was a transitional figure, his earlier buildings are Baroque, reflecting the time he spent in Rome in the early 18th century, but he adjusted his style after 1720.

Regularity of housefronts along a street was a desirable feature of Georgian town planning.

The period saw the growth of a distinct and trained architectural profession; before the mid-century "the high-sounding title, 'architect' was adopted by anyone who could get away with it".

This contrasted with earlier styles, which were primarily disseminated among craftsmen through the direct experience of the apprenticeship system.

The height was usually highest in the centre, and the Baroque emphasis on corner pavilions often found on the continent generally avoided.

In grand houses, an entrance hall led to steps up to a piano nobile or mezzanine floor where the main reception rooms were.

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